A Coast to Coast Cycle along Hadrian’s Wall

Sycamore Gap

For a while I had a vague plan to cycle across the width of the country, from the Solway Firth in the west back to Newcastle. I’d been put off previously by concerns about getting to Carlisle with my bike on the train and a lack of routes that avoided main roads between Carlisle and Brampton.

On a quiet evening I decided to put the plan in to action and got the maps out again for a session going between maps and Street View which confirmed that there were quiet, if slightly indirect, roads everywhere I wanted to go. I eventually decided on a route following NCN72 in places and going more directly east elsewhere. Continue reading “A Coast to Coast Cycle along Hadrian’s Wall”

Cycling up Great Dunn Fell – Britain’s Highest Road*

Climbing Great Dunn Fell

On the 30th July 2017 I set out to ride the Great Dun Fell Sportive – Ride to the Radar, run by Sport in Action.

The main feature of the event is the final climb of Great Dun Fell. At 848m above sea level Great Dunn Fell is the second highest summit in the Pennines and, more importantly, the summit is the highest point you can cycle to on a paved road in Britain.

This seemed like a good summer challenge which led to me picking up my friend at 6am for the journey to Appleby-in-Westmorland. Continue reading “Cycling up Great Dunn Fell – Britain’s Highest Road*”

Cycling past historic sites

Pitsford Reservoir

On a visit to Northamptonshire in November 2014 a of morning cycling took me past a number of sites including a civil war battle field, cold war missile launch pads, through Victorian railway tunnels, and the reputed inspiration for a Jane Austin novel.

The first site of note I passed was a disused airfield at Harrington. Originally build by the US Army during World War 2 it later became a launch site for Thor nuclear missiles during the late 1950s. Not a lot remains but the foundations of the launch pads can still be seen and the course of the runway is just about discernible. Continue reading “Cycling past historic sites”